costsmorethanspace:


What costs more than space exploration? Safety razors.
According to the Boston Globe, Gillette, the Proctor & Gamble subsidiary based in the Boston area, spent $750 million developing and testing the three-bladed Mach 3 safety razor, which debuted in 1998. Other sources cite a total development cost of $1 billion; as best as I can tell, those larger estimates include the cost of the marketing campaign associated with the product’s launch. Gillette’s Mach 3 was followed relatively quickly by Schick’s four-bladed Quattro razor (the subject of litigation filed by Gillette), and later by Gillette’s newer, five-bladed Fusion razor (a product predicted well in advance by the Onion). 
According to a NASA study, the total development cost for the Falcon 9 rocket, which conducted its maiden flight in 2010, was $299.9 million. (Using the Bureau of Labor Statistics calculator, 299.9 million in 2010 is the equivalent of about $225 million in 1998, the year the Mach 3 debuted). SpaceX has reported that the cost of developing its first rocket, the Falcon 1, was approximately the same.
Using Mach numbers to measure the speed of rockets is always a little tricky, since there is no sound in space, but at a rough level and using the colloquial definition, the top speed of the Falcon 9 rocket on a relatively standard mission is about Mach 23.
Photo adapted from Wikimedia Commons.
Hat-tip to reader AW, who suggested this one not long after I had (coincidentally) begun drafting the post.

costsmorethanspace:

What costs more than space exploration? Safety razors.

According to the Boston Globe, Gillette, the Proctor & Gamble subsidiary based in the Boston area, spent $750 million developing and testing the three-bladed Mach 3 safety razor, which debuted in 1998. Other sources cite a total development cost of $1 billion; as best as I can tell, those larger estimates include the cost of the marketing campaign associated with the product’s launch. Gillette’s Mach 3 was followed relatively quickly by Schick’s four-bladed Quattro razor (the subject of litigation filed by Gillette), and later by Gillette’s newer, five-bladed Fusion razor (a product predicted well in advance by the Onion). 

According to a NASA study, the total development cost for the Falcon 9 rocket, which conducted its maiden flight in 2010, was $299.9 million. (Using the Bureau of Labor Statistics calculator, 299.9 million in 2010 is the equivalent of about $225 million in 1998, the year the Mach 3 debuted). SpaceX has reported that the cost of developing its first rocket, the Falcon 1, was approximately the same.

Using Mach numbers to measure the speed of rockets is always a little tricky, since there is no sound in space, but at a rough level and using the colloquial definition, the top speed of the Falcon 9 rocket on a relatively standard mission is about Mach 23.

Photo adapted from Wikimedia Commons.

Hat-tip to reader AW, who suggested this one not long after I had (coincidentally) begun drafting the post.

(via c1qfxugcgy0)

If you are bored and disgusted by politics and don’t bother to vote, you are in effect voting for the entrenched Establishments of the two major parties, who rest assured are not dumb and are keenly aware that it is in their interests to keep you disgusted and bored and cynical and to give you every possible psychological reason to stay at home doing one-hitters and watching MTV Spring Break on Primary Day. By all means stay home if you want, but don’t bullshit yourself that you’re not voting. In reality, there is no such thing as not voting: you either vote by voting, or you vote by staying home and tacitly doubling the value of some Diehard’s vote. David Foster Wallace, Rolling Stone, April 13, 2000
(via alexlikestowrite)

I would like everyone to know that the teachers in the English Dept at Alamogordo HS do not agree with the knee jerk reaction of pulling Neverwhere from the Dept. library. It has been successful as a supplemental novel and since our goal is to get students engaged and encourage their thinking, this novel is a keeper — the students love it. The passage the parent is referring to is not graphic, but it is an adult type situation…a very briefly visited one.

I am sorry our school administrators did not stand up and support the material the way we all would have expected them to do. Also, as much as we hate to expose anyone for not speaking the truth, this parent had publicly stated that the school was “forcing” her student to read the novel (not true), and she also stated that the school never offered her daughter an alternate selection when she objected to Neverwhere. This statement is one that we will vehemently deny. The mother is stating inaccurate comments publicly. I work with the teacher in question – a very capable and intelligent young woman that is an asset to the English Dept.- and she immediately provided an alternate novel to the student as soon as the mother made the first known objection to Gaiman’s novel.

We simply cannot stand for banning a book for hundreds of students this year and in the years to come because a single parent objected over one brief passage on ONE page. Making inaccurate comments about the teacher (whom the parent chose not to even meet, but publicly disrespected her and questioned her credentials in spite of that), saying we forced anyone to read a text she objected to, or stating that no alternative assignment was offered is absolutely false. Teachers are sensitive to the needs of their students.

Our students have enjoyed Gaiman’s novel for almost ten years, and it saddens us to think that our future students will not have the same opportunity.

The teachers in the English Dept are opposed to any form of censorship. This situation is being handled incorrectly, it makes our school and our town appear as if we are fine with suspending the use of a book that is used by middle and high schools across the country and around the globe. We are not fine with it, and we want people to know that.

Kathy Wallis commenting in School Library Journal on the banning of NEVERWHERE at Alamogordo High School, New Mexico.

The original article reported from the parent’s point of view has gotten nationwide play, can we boost the signal on this as well please?

(via shellytotter)

(via hodgman)

Why Video Games Take So Long to Publish

hatsuu:

It’s time for stuff! 

I’ve noticed a lot of people being frustrated when games don’t come out as soon as they’d like, so I’d like to share why those games seem to take forever, as well as pointers. This doesn’t just apply to my company, but to many companies, even! It’ll be fairly helpful.

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Oh good, tumblr finally fixed whatever was preventing the ‘new post’ UI from spawning.